Tag Archives: frustration

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Jeeves, what is this on my forehead?

That wrinkle? That is age, sir.

Wipe it off, please.

There you go, sir.

I need to look dashing for tonigh–it’s still there, Jeeves.

What is, sir?

The age! It’s still there!

No it’s not.

Then what is it!?

Oh that, sir? That’s frustration.

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“Defenestration”

When I hear “defenestration,” I think of two things. 1: Frustration, because it goes well with defenestration; eg: “it’s frustrating that auto-correct thinks defenestration is a word while defenestrate is not. I need to find a window and defenestrate my frustration.” And 2: What is fenestration? The act of catching things flying in through the window? I sure hope so. I find not the need for such a silly word because indubitably  the word begs the question of “what does it mean?” And so you have to take the time to explain the word which makes you appear pompous and highfalutin because you’re intentionally saying things that other people know, but are being exclusive by using such elevated diction. Such language can be used to exclude people from a ‘circle,’ or conversely can be used to make people feel a sense of belonging, or closeness; like an inside joke. You offhandedly mention defenestration in conversation and have to explain it to a friend, but next time when the topic naturally arises, your friend knows what it means and feels special. We should all use plain and simple words and no one should feel special! Ever! Or maybe I’m just jealous… and had to google “defenestration.”

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